Monday, March 19, 2018

Little Ella's Pin Money

I have been so sick the last few weeks, that there has been very little spanking happening at Sam and Ella's house.  I needed to write a personal narrative for a writing group in which I participate.

                                                     Here's hoping you all enjoy it, too.




Most kids find some way to earn spending money.  You know - mowing lawns, babysitting, washing the car.  It was very special that I could work for my father in the family business from the age of eight years old.  It was a wonderful little job for 4 hours a week, and I got to spend time alone with my dad, which I treasured. 


But I was an ambitious and clever little girl, and I like to think I was innovative, too.  There were markets out there just waiting for a gutsy 11 year old entrepreneur named Ella with a ponytail and a bicycle.





We had lived in the same subdivision of new houses since I was six years old.  Tons of children with whom to play.  In the winter all the kids built snow forts and had snowball wars.  We dragged sleds and toboggans to the top of the highest hill at the park by the railroad tracks.  In the summer, we played hardball in an empty field across the street.  Our dads helped us lay out a regulation baseball diamond and even built us a backstop.  We rode our bikes to the city swimming pool in the afternoons.  We were neighbors and friends.


I stumbled on the idea for my business on a summer day when I discovered my brother and a group of the neighborhood boys
poring over a dirty magazine that they found in a garbage bin.  At first, they tried to hide what they were doing, but I soon reminded them that I was not a girl who tattled.  I checked out the magazine for myself.  Lots of boobs and butts and arty cover ups for the genital area.  Not really racy by today's standards, but the guys were very motivated .  I listened to them bemoan the fact that this kind of magazine was kept behind the counter at every news agency and drugstore in town.  Besides, they were all petrified that parents would find out if they tried to buy one.




So a totally amazing marketing opportunity dropped from the sky right into my lap.  The deal was that I would purchase any magazine they wanted with a 100% markup.  Money was required up front.  I started my business small - just the boys on the block.  I was the sole proprietor and purposely did not confide in any of my girlfriends.  Some of them were a little "goody two shoes," if you know what I mean, and I didn't want any parents involved.






The first time I went to the little news agency in our town, I was a bit nervous.  I knew the man who owned it because I bought comic books and fountain drinks there.  Looking as cute and smiley as I could, I put my Little Lulu comic book and a candy bar on the counter and politely asked for about 4 or 5 of the clear-wrapped magazines I could see on a rack behind the cash register.  He hesitated, so I smiled even bigger and said, "They're for my big brother.  Could you please put them in a bag for me, Glenn?"

                                            And he did!




Soon I was shopping at about 6 locations in our town and the village next door.  My clientele grew by leaps and bounds.  There were adolescent boys who lived up to a half mile away who made orders through the guys I knew, my "preferred" customers.  Then the boy cousins in the family got wind of my business, and
suddenly I was tapping into such a bigger market.  The profits were phenomenal, and I didn't even have time to spend the income that was rolling in.  Practically on the Fortune 500 annual list.  I had orders for Playboy, of course.  But to keep the guys interested, I found copies of magazines like Gent, Stud, and Bachelor.  Penthouse was another standard.  Once, when on a trip to downtown Chicago, I found a real prize right in Union Station; I think it was called Stag or Stag Party.  As CEO of this little company, I decided there would be a surcharge for that particular issue.  Highly prized and shared among the guys.


  

I never really worried about my parents.  I figured even if they found out, my mother would ignore it completely if it had anything to do with sex.  She wouldn't even say the word.  My dad?  Well, he might even turn out to be another customer.




Alas, this lucrative enterprise was doomed to hit the rocks sooner or later.  I was actually surprised that it lasted as long as it did.  Little Ella kept thinking how dumb the boys were not to figure out they could buy their own magazines.  And then, one of them finally did.  The business tanked within a week.


Back to babysitting.  Damn, but it did pay the bills.  I did not enjoy it, though.  Much preferred working for Dad, and he gave me more hours at the store as I got older, too.  With raises along the way.  Once we were all grown up, the secret came out.  As I predicted, my mother refused to even speak about it.  Dad just laughed his ass off.  To this day, when my older male cousin and my brother get together, someone always mentions my dirty magazine business.  I like to remember it as an early venture into the world of finance.







                                    

24 comments:

  1. Hi Ella,

    I'm sorry you have been so sick and hope you are feeling much better soon.

    This was a wonderful read and made me giggle. Ella the little entrepreneur lol, love it! Working for your Dad and spending time with him must have been wonderful. I worked for mine for a spell as a teenager.

    Hugs
    Roz

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    Replies
    1. Hello there, Roz,
      I have to knock on wood before I tell you that I am getting better. This has been the flu/cold from hell.

      My dad was such a character, and I do seem to be carrying on the tradition.

      Sending Hugs Down Under,
      Ella

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  2. Hi Ella, what a brave little thing you were. Hope you are feelling better now.
    love Jan, xx

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    1. I was quite the tomboy, and got up to a lot of mischief when I was little. Never wore a dress if I could help it!

      Trying to be Well!
      Ella

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  3. Hi Ella, sorry you are so unwell. Sending positive healing vibes your way. What a clever little Ella you were, pity the boys twigged to your little scheme. Would have been so nice working with your dad.
    Hugs Lindy xx

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Lindy,
      I appreciate the healing thoughts.

      I LOVED working with my dad, and I have such fond memories of those years.

      Sending Hugs Down Under,
      Ella

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  4. I can just picture you doing that...quite the entrepreneur! :-)
    Such happy memories working for your dad
    Hugs to you

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    Replies
    1. I hope you are feeling better...sending healing energy your way

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    2. You make me smile, Terps. :) I did have freckles, too. Quite the goofy looking girl. I enjoyed people even back then. Also hated taking baths. Luckily that has changed.

      Hugs From Ella

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  5. Absolutely fabulous! Brains and courage both, makes for a formidable woman.

    I hope you are fully on the road to recovery now!

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    Replies
    1. Why, thank you, PK. Brains and courage are quite the compliments.

      I need to be well soon, as I am heading off on a visit to see my sister and then a dear friend.

      Wish me Health!
      Ella

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  6. Ella,
    You and I would have made a fantastic kid team. We would have made bundles of money. I loved this story reflecting your resourceful thinking and money-loving ways.
    Meredith

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    1. Oh, I laughed at this comment, Mere. We would have been a dynamic duo, for sure. There were other schemes I got up to, but working for my dad was the best job a kid could ever have.

      Hugs From Ella

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  7. Very cute story! Hope you're on the mend.
    --Baker

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    1. Thanks, Baker. Glad you liked this little story from my childhood. My mom never knew what I was up to, but she was such a fun parent.

      Hugs From Ella

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  8. It doesn't surprise me at all. Clever girl. Loved reading this.

    Love,
    Ronnie
    xx

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    Replies
    1. Ronnie, you made me laugh. Perhaps I should have expected you to say that. I think you and I share a rather kinky perspective on life. Glad you liked it.

      Hugs Across the Pond,
      Ella

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  9. Hi Ella ... hoping you and Sam are on the mend ... especially hard when both of you are sick.
    What a great little story to share with your writing group and us. You were a very brave little entrepreneur! I don't think I'd have had the courage to do that at that age! (altho' I think I was stealthing my Dad's girly mag collection by then :>))
    It also sounds like you had a special relationship with your Dad ... your fond memories show through and make a wonderful story.
    nj ... xx

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    Replies
    1. Good for you, NJ. Curiosity didn't kill the cat; it made them into very interesting grown ups. I could tell a hundred stories of my dad, and, in fact, that is a dream of mine.

      Take good care of yourself, too!
      Ella

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  10. That is seriously the best story. I am laughing out loud. Thank you for sharing it!

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    1. Lea, you are so sweet. I love that it made you laugh. It still makes me laugh when I remember this time in my life. I was a great baseball player, too!

      Hugs From Ella

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  11. Love that story..the teacher in my says..A++, I am wishing we were neighbors and could be your assistant. Glad you are finally feeling better...I am hoping spring makes an appearance soon here. hugs abby

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  12. Thanks, Abby! I think I am turning the corner, but still get very tired.
    Glad you liked the story. I read around in those magazines before I delivered them. Learned a lot.

    Hugs From Ella

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  13. This is so funny, and an excellent read! From reading your blog posts this little story of yours doesn’t surprise me one bit, your personality shines right through, and to me you’ve always come across like a real go-getter. Good for you for being so enterprising at such a young age.
    I love the way you write about your father, no doubt it makes him smile.
    Hope you’re both feeling better soon.

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